Brassneck, Oh Beautiful Brassneck

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We’ve all seen them – bands of seismologists hanging around at stations and street corners in their shoddy labcoats, holding their seismometers aloft and proselytizing about “The Big One” – the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that could hit the Pacific Northwest at any time. Well just a couple of weeks ago, Vancouverites living in the Mount Pleasant area could have been forgiven for grabbing their emergency coolers and taking refuge in their underground parkades as a gentle rumble built to a wall-shaking tremor and a 5-6 foot wave of drooling craft beer enthusiasts flooded the streets. Soaked through with sweat, they blindly fought their way through the blistering hot, smoke-filled streets in search of Brassneck, navigating by muscle memory alone as they waved their wallets in the air chanting “cans, cans, cans”.

Brassneck is consistently rated as one of the best breweries in Vancouver but their beers rarely make it further than their tasting room and when they do they only reach a few select taps around the city.  It should come as no surprise then that the announcement that they had started canning their beer was greeted with such fervor.

Brassneck has a particularly strong identity and a very unique aesthetic - an impressive feat for a brewery that doesn’t really package their product for off sales other than in growlers. The brewery’s identity was originally designed by Alex Nelson & Beau House of Post Projects, with whom they partnered once more for this their first foray into the world of cans. Teaming up with photographer Vishal Marapon they produced an exquisite run of digitally printed pressure sensitive labels. Few pressure sensitive labels manage to escape the “sticker-on-a-can” look, no matter what you put on them. These, however, really do. Metallic inks expertly matched to the silver of the can commandeer the metal as part of the design, while high contrast shots taken around the brewery and tap room by Vishal Marapon are paired up at random with bright daubs of colour that act as the backdrop for the name of the beer.

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We got in touch with Alex Nelson at Post Projects to find out a bit more about the design process and the concept behind these cans:

 

Hi Alex! I’m enamoured with the new cans. Could you tell us a bit about your design process and the concept behind them? Did you face any challenges designing for such a prolific brewery?

Our client, Brassneck Brewery founders Nigel Springthorpe and Conrad Gmoser, wanted to develop a series of cans that would evoke and reference the brewery space and tasting room. The final concept that we landed on involved collaborating with photographer Vishal Marapon to develop a series of high contrast black and white images which showcase the space and its myriad textures and surfaces.

The next challenge in the process was to find a way to develop a design system that would account for the huge (and constantly evolving) range of beers that Brassneck offers—32 of these beer styles were included in the first print run alone. A key factor in executing the cans was leveraging the latest in printing technology to maintain the quality and flexibility required for a project like this. Working with the team at Summit Print, the cans were run on HP digital printers and made use of a technology called database printing. This allowed us to use a group of base templates and run a series of 16 different photographs on the back of the label. To accommodate the beer style variations, we developed a ‘chalk smear’ design element which is then applied to each roll of labels.

Brassneck is always creating new beers. It’s a key part of their brand and who they are. Since opening in 2013, they’ve brewed and released over 80 different styles. It was critical to the project that they have a label design system that can be updated and executed as quickly as they make new beers.

 

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I'm really into the idea of the "can as canvas". Do you have any thoughts on the interconnectedness of the art/design and beer worlds at the moment?

For better or worse, design and beer are indeed becoming bedfellows these days. Our design decisions are mostly focused with producing something that's on-brand rather than trying to make a can a piece of art.

One interesting thing to note is that, due to the rise of smaller craft beer producers, you’re seeing a need for alternative modes of printing and packaging, such as shrink wrapping and pressure labels that can satisfy the smaller batches that these breweries produce. With the smaller runs, there seems to be a sense of decreased risk that leads to more experimentation in label design.

It’s safe to say these cans could not be more Brassneck if they tried. Post Projects absolutely knocked it out of the park in terms of producing something on-brand and in doing so created a can that acts as a canvas for Vishal Marapon’s stunning photography. Brassneck has always stood well apart from the noise of the craft beer market, in my opinion. By only serving their beer through their own tap room and trusted partners they aren’t forced to dilute their essence or make any compromises. No doubt, the beer wouldn't have made it anywhere near a can if they were going to be anything less than perfect and, of course, they don’t have to jostle for shelf space and risk getting lost in a sea of brands because they’re only sold in one fridge. The one at Brassneck.

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